What is in OMBucha® Kombucha that is so good for my health & gut

Health Benefits of drinking Kombucha

Read the full article here on why craft OMBucha® is great for your gut and health.

In the United Kingdom, we’re not allowed to make any claims about Probiotics – as can be seen here: Article 13.1 2009;7(9):1247 from Great Britain nutrition and health claims (NHC) register – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). So you won’t find any information or claims related to Probiotics in relation to any of our products in the UK. Please do not ask us probiotic or gut health related questions, rather, please do your own research from Google and come to your own conclusions and of course, always discuss health matters with a fully qualified and highly trusted (hopefully pillar of health) GP at all times!

May Improve Digestion
As suggested by many enthusiasts, empirical data proposes that Kombucha tea potentially promotes healthy digestion. Many Kombucha lovers are attributing to the process of fermentation with a live colony of bacteria and yeast, that the beneficial application of fermented tea, may help sustain the gut health and provides relief from various abdominal disorders including chronic constipation and diarrhoea symptoms. The digestive enzymes present in it enhance the effects of glucuronic acid and aid in the breakdown of proteins and saccharides thereby, potentially assisting normal regulation of the digestive system.

Many enthusiasts believe Kombucha possesses antibiotic properties i.e. bactericidal and bacteriostatic which works against a range of pathogens and is used for therapeutic purposes in human as well as veterinary treatments – though this has not been factually assessed in the UK, and variation in ones Kombucha brewing is derived from the source of the SCOBY.

Could Detoxify the Body
Kombucha may have a remarkable reputation for the ability to detoxify the body according to many online sources. Some proponents of Kombucha attribute this potential to a powerful detoxifier glucuronic acid that may be present in some Kombucha brews, which theoretically binds some toxins from the liver and then assisting eliminating them out of the body via kidneys, from what we have researched.

Possible Antioxidant Agent
Kombucha contains profuse amounts of organic acids like glucuronic acid, of which, some have been noted globally, though not in the UK, to possibly work as powerful antioxidants which may help in shielding the body from oxidative damage. The possibility of antioxidants present in some Kombucha teas, could look out for the oxygen free radicals and neutralize their effects thereby, some enthusiasts speculate that this might be helping repairing and protecting the body from diseases and inflammations.

Maybe Even Liver Support
Another suggested action purported by kombucha lovers, is its possible hepatic-protective effects. A research study conducted on kombucha tea has shown that its tea helps in restoring the levels of glutathione and some specialists outside of the UK have speculated that this may represent a remarkably effectual way in reducing possible hepatotoxicity. A comparative study conducted on black tea, kombucha tea, and enzyme-processed black tea has indicated the efficacy and superiority of kombucha tea in possibly providing hepatic protection against toxicity maybe attributing to its antioxidant potential, as compared to the latter.

Possible Anti-microbial Effects
Kombucha tea has even been suggested by some to possess anti-microbial properties which may prove effective against a variety of pathogens. An investigative research has revealed that apart from acetic acid, it contains other promising anti-microbial components which even at neutral values of pH, may possibly provide protection against a range of microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureaus, Staphylococcus epidermis, Escherichia Coli, Salmonella enteriditis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogens, and Helicobacter pylori.

The specific bacteria and yeast strains in the kombucha are what make it act the way it does, and what produces the fizz and flavour of kombucha. Not all kombucha cultures will contain the exact same strains, but these are some that have been recorded in studies:

Acetobacter [2] is an aerobic (requiring oxygen) bacteria strain that produces acetic acid and gluconic acid. It is always found in kombucha. Acetobacter strains also build the SCOBY mushroom. Acetobacter xylinoides and acetobacter ketogenum are two strains that you might find in kombucha.

Saccharomyces [2] includes a number of yeast strains that produce alcohol and are the most common types of yeast found in kombucha. They can be aerobic or anaerobic (requires an oxygen-free environment). They include Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Saccharomycodes apiculatus, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zygosaccharomyes, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Brettanomyces [2] is another type of yeast strain, either aerobic or anaerobic, that are commonly found in kombucha and produce alcohol or acetic acid.

Lactobacillus [2]: A type of aerobic bacteria that is sometimes, but not always, found in kombucha. It produces lactic acid and slime.

Pediococcus [2]: These anaerobic bacteria produce lactic acid and slime. They are sometimes, but not always, found in kombucha.

Gluconacetobacter kombuchae [2] is an anaerobic bacteria that is unique to kombucha. It feeds on nitrogen that is found in tea and produces acetic acid and gluconic acid, as well as building the SCOBY.

Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis [3] is a yeast strain that is unique to kombucha. It produces alcohol and carbonation as well as contributing to the mushroom body.

Glucuronic acid
Maybe the body’s most important detoxifier. When toxins enter the liver this acid could bind them to it and assist in flushing them out through the kidneys. It has been suggested that once bound by glucuronic acid toxins cannot escape. A product of the oxidation process of glucose, glucuronic acid is one of the more significant constituents of Kombucha. As a promising potential detoxifying agent it might be one of the few agents that can cope with pollution from the products of the petroleum industry, including all the plastics, herbicides, pesticides and resins. It could help kidnap the phenols in the liver, which are then eliminated easily by the kidneys. Reportedly, Kombucha could be very helpful for allergy sufferers. Another by-product of glucuronic acid are the glucosamines, the structures associated with cartilage, collagen and the fluids which lubricate the joints. It is this function that has been suggested might allow Kombucha to be effective against arthritis.

Glucuronolactone, glucuronic acid is involved in the metabolism of detoxification in the liver whose glucuronyl rest of the body is linked to a group of foreign compounds or any of the metabolites in the body so that they become soluble in water and are excreted in the urine. Glucuronic acid should be distinguished from gluconic acid because it is linear and the gluconic acid is formed by oxidation of the different carbon glucose atom.

Lactic Acid
Essential for the digestive system. Assist blood circulation, helps prevent bowel decay and constipation. Aids in balancing acids and alkaline in the body and believed to help in the prevention of cancer by helping to regulate blood pH levels.

Acetic Acid
A powerful preservative and it inhibits harmful bacteria.

Usnic Acid
A natural antibiotic that can be effective against many viruses.

Oxalic Acid
An effective preservative and encourages the intercellular production of energy.

Malic Acid
Helps detoxify the liver.

Gluconic Acid
Produced by the bacteria, it can break down to caprylic acid is of great benefit to sufferers of candidiasis and other yeast infections such as thrush.

Butyric acid
Produced by the yeast, protects human cellular membranes and combined with Gluconic acid strengthens the walls of the gut to combat yeast infections like candida.

Kombucha also contains a variety of other nutrients, particularly various acids and esters that give the drink its characteristic tang and fizz. Included in these components is gluconic acid, which is the primary difference between the makeup of kombucha and the makeup of apple cider vinegar.

Flavonoids
Flavonoids are part of a large class of chemicals called polyphenols that occur naturally in plants. Flavonoids, which are found in a variety of fruits and vegetables as well as in tea and red wine, are thought to maintain health in part by combating oxidation. That’s why they’re called antioxidants. Antioxidants help the body’s cells resist damage by free radicals. Tea has one of the highest total flavonoid contents of all plants at 15% of the leaf by dry weight and is the major source of flavonoids in the UK diet, providing approximately 80% of dietary flavonoids for the population as a whole.
So don’t stop drinking your tea!

The actual bacteria, sugar, and acid content of kombucha depend on many factors, including the initial culture, the type of tea used, the type of sugar used, the strength of the tea, the type of water, the brewing time, the culturing temperature, and more. Due to the nature of kombucha, it is not possible to state an exact microbial composition for Kombucha. [1]

While different SCOBYs may vary in their exact makeup, what is common to all kombuchas is gluconic acid, acetic acid, and fructose. [2]

SOURCES

1. Ai Leng Teoha,, Gillian Heard, Julian Cox.(2044). Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 95(2), 119-126. doi:10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2003.12.020

2. Jayabalan, R., Malini, K., Sathishkumar, M., Swaminathan, K., & Yun, S. E. (2010). Biochemical characteristics of tea fungus produced during kombucha fermentation. Food Science and Biotechnology, 19(3), 843-847.

3. Kurtzman, C. P., Robnett, C. J. and Basehoar-Powers, E. (2001), Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, a new ascosporogenous yeast from ‘Kombucha tea’. FEMS Yeast Research, 1: 133–138. doi: 10.1111/j.1567-1364.2001.tb00024.x