Why does OMBucha® Kombucha contain sugar

As with any fermentation process, sugar is necessary to feed the yeast. Think about yoghurt, the yoghurt cultures consume the milk sugar (lactose)  to produce a sweet-tart milk product teaming with probiotics.

In the United Kingdom, we’re not allowed to make any claims about Probiotics – as can be seen here: Article 13.1 2009;7(9):1247 from Great Britain nutrition and health claims (NHC) register – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). So you won’t find any information or claims related to Probiotics in relation to any of our products in the UK. Please do not ask us probiotic or gut health related questions, rather, please do your own research from Google and come to your own conclusions and of course, always discuss health matters with a fully qualified and highly trusted (hopefully pillar of health) GP at all times!

The process is similar for kombucha. The sugar feeds the yeast, which creates CO2 & ethanol, then the bacteria consume the ethanol and convert it into acids. Very little sugar remains when it is bottled depending on how long the fermentation process lasts. Moreover, the fermentation process cleaves sucrose (polysaccharide) into fructose and glucose – both of which are utilised by the fermentation process thereby reducing the glycemic load.

Over time the sugar diminishes as the tea conditions as the yeast continue to digest the sugar. In OMBucha the sugar will settle at around 4g/100ml when fully conditioned. With kombucha, sugar is a necessary evil but the good components vastly outweigh the relatively small amount of sugar in a glass and some cray folk actually suggest are doing you far more good than any potential harm (though we’ll let you and your GP decide on what is best for you).

Sugar is the critical food that is utilised in the fermentation process to produce all the delicious vital elements of a good kombucha (that we’re obliged legally not to talk about in the UK), which you can learn more about here – sugar a necessary evil…